GUEST POST: A Brief History of Gothic Fashion

Hey guys! This post comes in quite a different format. It’s my first guest post by the guys over at Blackrose. When I looked at the inforgraphic they wondered if I would share I knew you guys would be interested! Especially in the light of the video 40 Years of Goth Fashion video that’s been going around and getting a hell of a lot of mixed reviews.


If you were a little iffy about the video’s merging together of genres and the lack of specific dates I know you’ll love this!



Check out the original post here!

Gothic Fashion: Generic Term For Fashion

With origins in the most recent two decades of the twentieth
century, Goth subculture re-joins common themes under various forms of
art. As of late, one of the branches associated with Goth subculture
that has increased tremendous prevalence is Goth fashion;
this art structure has succeeded in having an impact on the whole
fashion industry and keeps on moving even the most prestigious of
designers. 
At Blackrose we
thought it is fascinating to discover how the Gothic sub-society of the
past changed and turned into the Goth fashion that we know and love
today. Look through the
infographic below to skim through the advancement of Gothic fashion from
the 1970 to today, look at the distinctions in male gothic fashion and
female gothic fashion, and take in more about the diverse styles. We
stock a colossal assortment of apparel to suit
everybody’s taste. Shop by brand, style, or contact to discover more
about us and our things.

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6 Comments

  1. Somebody put a lot of time into this infographic and it looks well done. The timeline is very vague, though, and doesn't reflect the changes through the decades…black polish, lace, leather were pretty much staples for all the decades. And how is there no 90s goth? It's an impossible task to combine goth fashion in an infographic, and it is cool someone was trying.

  2. I love how much work was put into this and thumbs up for that but honestly I think the author failed to demonstrate how diverse goth fashion really is – It looked like a mashup of victorian goth, just in different variations. No 80s trad goth? And since when does Victoria Bekham represent the subculture (I was baffled at this, tbh)???
    The common goth looks just look like a gothabilly version to me. How is wearing a peep toe shoe common? There are so many inaccurate descriptions here and it's a shame 🙁

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